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CN AB: Editorial: High Time For Province

Canada (MAP) - Wed, 12/13/2017 - 08:00
The Calgary Sun, 13 Dec 2017 - As we stumble down the cobblestones on the uneven and relatively unchartered path to marijuana legalization, we're bound to trip once or twice. But so far, we have to give props to the provincial government for appearing to get it right.
Categories: Canada

Chronicle AM: First Look at Ohio Legalization Initiative, HSBC Gets Off Probation, More... (12/12/17)

Canada (STDW) - Tue, 12/12/2017 - 21:42

The folks behind Ohio's 2015 "monopoly" marijuana legalization are back with details on their proposed "free market" 2018 initiative, Denver gets its first marijuana social club application, the Justice Department ends its deferred prosecution agreement with HSBC bank over drug cartel money laundering, and more.

[image:1 align:left]Marijuana Policy

First Look at Proposed Ohio Legalization Initiative. The two men behind Ohio's failed 2015 marijuana legalization "monopoly" initiative held a press conference Monday outlining their proposed 2018 initiative. Unlike the 2015 initiative, next year's version would be a "free market" approach, there would be a local option to ban pot businesses, public smoking of marijuana would not be allowed, businesses would have to stay 500 from schools and churches, and individuals would have the right to grow their own (although landlords could forbid tenants from doing so). Organizers said they plan to submit their initiative to state officials next month.

Denver Gets First Marijuana Social Club Application. A business that wants to allow on-site vaping and consumption of marijuana edibles has become the first to apply for a marijuana social club license. Denver residents voted to allow such businesses when they approved Initiative 300 last year. The Coffee Joint next faces a public hearing, but has already won the backing of its local neighborhood association.

Law Enforcement

Justice Department Closes File on HSBC Drug Money Laundering. The Department of Justice will end its deferred prosecution agreement with HSBC, Europe's largest bank, after five years, marking the end of its punishment of the bank for laundering hundreds of millions of dollars in Mexican drug cartel funds. DOJ hit HSBC with a $1.9 billion fine and imposed the five-year deal in 2012, demanding that HSBC strengthen its sanctions and anti-money laundering programs, which it has now apparently done. No one has faced criminal charges in the case.

International

Canada Federal Government, Provinces Reach Agreement on Marijuana Taxes. Canada's federal government and the provinces have agreed in principle on a two-year tax sharing agreement that would give provinces 75% of the eventual revenues. The federal Liberals have proposed a 10% excise tax on marijuana products and had originally proposed splitting the money 50-50, but have now retreated in the face of loudly-voiced provincial concerns that they would bear most of the burden of legalization-related costs.

Categories: Canada

Chronicle AM: Ohio Legalization Initiative Planned, Canada Regulation Faces Speed Bump, More... (12/11/17)

Canada (STDW) - Mon, 12/11/2017 - 21:38

California is getting ready for the legal pot industry, some Ohio operators want another crack at a legalization initiative, Canadian Tories are threatening to retard the passage of the marijuana legalization bills there, and more.

[image:1 align:right caption:true]Marijuana Policy

California Secretary of State Launches Online Portal for Cannabusinesses. Secretary of State Alex Padilla has launched on online portal aimed at helping would-be ganjapreneurs get in on the state's emerging $7 billion legal marijuana industry. Padilla's office won't start accepting registrations until January 1, but the portal, cannabizfile.sos.ca.gov, is up and online now.

Ohio Backers of Failed 2015 Legalization Initiative Will Try Again in 2018. One of the cofounders of ResponsibleOhio, whose 2015 legalization initiative fell short at the polls, is set to propose on Monday a "free market" marijuana legalization initiative. Jim Gould and Ian James, the two cofounders of ResponsibleOhio, unsuccessfully applied for one of the state's two dozen medical marijuana cultivation licenses. Their 2015 initiative would have limited commercial cultivation to 10 preselected sites owned by the campaign's funders.

Drug Policy

Florida Democrats Call for Reviving State Drug Czar Office. Several Democratic state legislators have filed legislation, House Bill 865, which would bring back the shuttered state Office of Drug Control. A similar measure has been filed in the state Senate. The lawmakers said the office is needed to coordinate state-level responses to the opioid crisis.

International

Canada Tories Could Throw Wrench in Marijuana Legalization Timeline. Conservative senators are threatening to hold up passage of the pair of bills that would legalize marijuana in the country. The Tories are saying that it could take months for them "to do our job properly." A delay in the much anticipated July 1 deadline for legalization could sow confusion among provincial governments, which are negotiating contracts with suppliers, as well as marijuana businesses that are ramping up production and signing leases for storefronts and warehouses.

Georgia Drug Reformers Hold Big Protests Against "Repressive" Drug Policies. The White Noise Movement, an NGO calling for drug reforms in the former Soviet republic, held massive protests in the county's three largest cities -- Tbilisi, Kutaisi, and Batumi -- on Sunday. The Sunday rallies marked the UN's global Human Rights Day and protestors rallied under the banner "End the Repressive Drug Policy." Demonstrators called on parliament to adopt a draft law that would end imprisonment for personal drug possession and consumption.

Categories: Canada

CN ON: Communities Can Delay, Not Deny Pot Shops

Canada (MAP) - Sat, 12/09/2017 - 08:00
London Free Press, 09 Dec 2017 - TORONTO-Communities across Ontario cannot opt out of hosting a government-run pot shop if they are selected for a site, the provincial government said Friday after at least one town expressed resistance to having a cannabis retail location. If a community is selected to host one of the marijuana shops, it could delay hosting the store but cannot completely opt out of having it, said Ontario's Ministry of Finance.
Categories: Canada

CN NS: Youth Psychiatrist Disappointed In Nova Scotia's Marijuana Age

Canada (MAP) - Sat, 12/09/2017 - 08:00
Truro Daily News, 09 Dec 2017 - DECISION Health officials are disappointed that the province has set the legal age for marijuana consumption at 19 years. The consensus among provincial and national health organizations is that the minimum age should be 21, and some believe it should be even older, said Dr. Phil Tibbo, director of the Nova Scotia Early Psychosis Program and a psychiatry professor at Dalhousie University.
Categories: Canada

CN ON: Pot Store Expected By Next Summer

Canada (MAP) - Sat, 12/09/2017 - 08:00
The Peterborough Examiner, 09 Dec 2017 - LCBO advises city that Peterborough will have one of the first 40 marijuana stores to open in Ontario Peterborough will have a marijuana store by next summer, says the city CAO. Allan Seabrooke said the store will sell marijuana for recreational use. He said it will be open by July - the same month weed is going to be legalized in Canada.
Categories: Canada

CN NS: Accused Released On Conditions

Canada (MAP) - Sat, 12/09/2017 - 08:00
Cape Breton Post, 09 Dec 2017 - Unprecedented support shown for drug accused In an unprecedented show of support for an accused, some 80 people crowded into two Sydney courtrooms Friday to attend a bail hearing for a man charged with drug trafficking.
Categories: Canada

CN PI: Editorial: Managing Marijuana

Canada (MAP) - Sat, 12/09/2017 - 08:00
The Journal-Pioneer, 09 Dec 2017 - The P.E.I. Liquor Control Commission is a good choice for managing Prince Edward Island's new marijuana stores. The LCC is well equipped for developing policy and providing oversight. It is also good that the provincial government has decided its pot sales will be conducted from different storefronts than its liquor sales.
Categories: Canada

CN ON: SAH Boss Talks Hospital Cannabis Policy

Canada (MAP) - Sat, 12/09/2017 - 08:00
The Sault Star, 09 Dec 2017 - Smoke-free means smoke-free at Sault Area Hospital - whether that applies to tobacco fixes or toking up. Sault Area Hospital currently has a no-cigarette policy that encompasses its entire property, which will apply once recreational pot becomes legal in Canada next summer.
Categories: Canada

CN BC: Editorial: At Least They're Trying

Canada (MAP) - Fri, 12/08/2017 - 08:00
Langley Times, 08 Dec 2017 - A funeral home in Aldergrove decided they needed to do something after seeing so many heartbroken families lose loved ones to a drug overdose. The funeral directors have put together an awareness and prevention campaign that does aim to shock people about how deadly drugs are. In an unusual move, the BC Coroner's Office has come out against Alternative Funeral and Cremation Service's awareness campaign, saying scare tactics don't work, they only further stigmatize drug users.
Categories: Canada

CN BC: LTE: Going To Pot

Canada (MAP) - Fri, 12/08/2017 - 08:00
Penticton Western, 08 Dec 2017 - Coming soon marijuana, a magical weed that feeds and gives the brain a high, Say goodbye, to yesterday's fix in the coffee shop, a journey awaits that can put you over the top. Grow your own weed a thing called pot. Roll a joint, you'll like it a lot.
Categories: Canada

Looking Back: The Biggest International Drug Policy Stories of the Past 20 Years [FEATURE]

Canada (STDW) - Thu, 12/07/2017 - 03:26

With a thousand issues of Drug War Chronicle under our belts, we look back on the biggest international drug and drug policy stories of the past 20 years. (A companion piece looks at the biggest US domestic drug policy stories.) Here's what we find:

[image:1 align:left caption:true]1. Global Prohibitionist Consensus Starts to Crumble

In 1998, the UN General Assembly Special Session on Drugs (UNGASS), with anti-prohibitionist voices in the room but metaphorically on the outside, pledged itself to eradicating drugs in 10 years. That didn't happen. Now, nearly 20 years later, it is duly chastened, and the chorus of critics is much louder, but the UN still remains a painfully slow place to try to make change in global drug policy.

Yet, despite the foot-dragging in Vienna and New York, albeit at a glacial pace. The 2016 UNGASS couldn't bring itself to actually say the words "harm reduction," but acknowledged the practice in its documents. It couldn't bring itself to resolve to be against the death penalty in drug cases, but a large and growing number of member states spoke out against it. It couldn't officially acknowledge that there is "widespread recognition from several quarters, including UN member states and entities and civil society, of the collateral harms of current drug policies, and that new approaches are both urgent and necessary," even though that's what the UN Development Program said. And the UN admitted to having dropped the ball on making opioid analgesics available in the developing world.

It certainly wasn't ready to talk about drug legalization in any serious fashion. But despite the rigidity within the global anti-drug bureaucracy, driven in part by the hardline positions of many Asian and Middle Eastern member states, the global prohibitionist consensus is crumbling. Many European and Latin America states are ready for a new direction, and some aren't waiting for the UN's imprimatur. Bolivia has rejected the 1961 Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs' provision criminalizing the coca plant, and Canada and Uruguay have both legalized marijuana with scant regard for UN treaty prohibitions. And of course there is Portugal's broad decriminalization system, encompassing all drugs.

There's a real lesson in all of this: The UN drug treaties, the legal backbone of global drug prohibition, have proven to be toothless. There is no effective mechanism for punishing most countries for violating those treaties, at least not relative to the punishing effects they suffer from prohibition. Other countries will take heed.

2. Afghanistan Remains the World's Opium Breadbasket

When the US invaded Afghanistan in late 2001, it entered into a seemingly endless war to defeat the Taliban and, along with it, the opium trade. Sixteen years and more than a trillion dollars later, it has defeated neither. Afghanistan was already the world's leading producer of opium then, and it still is.

According to the UN Office on Drugs and Crime, in 2000, the country produced more than 3,000 tons of opium. The following year, with the Taliban imposing a ban on poppy planting in return for US aid and international approval, production dropped to near zero. But in 2002, production was back to more than 3,000 tons, and Afghan poppy farmers haven't looked back since.

In the intervening years, Afghanistan has accounted for the vast majority of global opium production, reaching 90% in 2007 before plateauing to around 70% now (as production increases in Latin America). It has consistently produced at least 3,000 tons a year, with that amount doubling in selected years.

For years, US policymakers were caught in a dilemma, and drug war imperatives were subordinated to anti-Taliban imperatives. The problem was that any attempt to go after opium threatened to push peasants into the hands of the Taliban. Now, the Trump administration is bombing Taliban heroin facilities. But it hasn't bombed any heroin facilities linked to corrupt Afghan government officials.

[image:2 align:right caption:true]3. Movement Toward Acceptance of Recreational Marijuana

Twenty years ago, only the Netherlands had come to terms -- sort of -- with marijuana, formally keeping it illegal, but, in a prime example of the Dutch's policy of gedogen (pragmatic tolerance), with possession and sale of small amounts allowed. (The Dutch are only now finally dealing with the "backdoor problem," the question of where cannabis cafes are supposed to get their supplies if it can't be grown legally).

The first entities to legalize marijuana were the US states of Colorado and Washington in 2012, and Uruguay became the first country in the world to legalize marijuana in 2014. Canada will become the second country to do so next year. In the meantime, six more US states and the District of Columbia have also jumped on the bandwagon.

While full legalization may yet be a bridge too far for most European and Latin American countries, marijuana decriminalization has really taken hold there, with numerous countries in both regions having embraced the policy. Marijuana has now been decriminalized in Argentina, Austria, Belgium, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia (you can possess up to 22 grams legally), Costa Rica, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Equador, Estonia, Georgia, Greece, Italy, Jamaica, Luxembourg, Malta, Mexico, Moldova, Paraguay, Peru, Portugal, Slovenia, Spain, Switzerland, and Ukraine, among others. Oh, and Iran, too.

4. Andean Whack-A-Mole: The Fruitless Quest to Quash Cocaine

The United States, and to a much lesser degree, the European Union, have spent billions of dollars trying to suppress coca leaf cultivation and cocaine production in Bolivia, Colombia, and Peru. It hasn't worked.

According to the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), coca leaf cultivation was just under 500,000 acres in 1998; this week, UNODC reported that coca leaf cultivation was at 470,000 acres last year -- and that's not counting the 75,000 acres under legal cultivation in Bolivia.

When it comes to actual cocaine production, it's pretty much the same story: Again according to the UNODC, cocaine production was at 825 tons in 1998, peaked at just over a million tons a year in 2004-2007, and is now at just under 800 tons. There have been peaks and troughs, but here we are, pretty much in the same place we started.

Military intervention didn't stop it. Military and anti-drug assistance hasn't stopped it. Alternative development programs haven't stopped it. The global cocaine market is insatiable, and nothing has been able to tear Andean peasant farmers from what is by far their best cash crop. Bolivia, at least, has largely made peace with coca -- although not cocaine -- providing a legal, regulated market for coca farmers, but in Peru and Colombia eradication and redevelopment efforts continue to spark conflict and social unrest.

5. Mexico's Brutal Drug Wars

During the 1980s and 1990s, accusations ran rampant that in a sort of pax mafiosi, the Mexican government cut deals with leading drug trafficking groups to not so much fight the drug trade as manage it. Those were the days of single party rule by the PRI, which ended with the election of Vicente Fox in 2000. With the end of single party rule, the era of relative peace in the drug business began to unravel.

As old arrangements between drug traffickers and political and law enforcement figures fell apart, so did the informal codes that governed trafficker behavior. When once a cartel capo would accept his exemplary arrest, during the Fox administration, the gangsters began shooting back at the cops -- and fighting among themselves over who would control which profitable franchise.

Things took a turn for the worse with the election of Felipe Calderon in 2006 and his effort to burnish his political credentials by sending in the army to fight the increasingly wealthy, violent, and brazen cartels. And they haven't gotten any better since. While American attention to Mexico's drug wars peaked in 2012 -- a presidential election year in both countries -- and while the US has thrown more than a billion dollars in anti-drug aid Mexico's way in the past few years, the violence, lawlessness, and corruption continues. The death toll is now estimated to be around 200,000, and there's no sign anything is going to change anytime soon.

Well, unless we take leading 2018 presidential candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador (AMLO) at his word. This week, AMLO suggested a potential amnesty for cartel leaders, indicating, for some, at least, a pax mafiosi is better than a huge, endless pile of corpses.

6. Latin America Breaks Away from US Drug War Hegemony

The US imports its drugs and exports its prohibition-related violence, and the region grows tired of paying the price for America's war on its favorite vices. When once Latin American leaders quietly kowtowed to drug war demands from Washington, at least some of them have been singing a different tune in recent years.

Bolivia under Evo Morales has resolutely followed its own path on legalizing coca cultivation, despite bellows from Washington, successive Mexican presidents weary of the bloodshed turn an increasingly critical eye toward US drug war imperatives, Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos sees what Washington-imposed prohibitionist policies have done to his county and cries out for something different, and so did Guatemalan President Otto Perez Molina before he was forced out of office on corruption charges.

Latin American countries are also increasingly pursuing their own drug policies, whether it's constitutionally protected legalization of personal use amounts of drugs in Colombia, decriminalization of marijuana across the continent, or downright legalization in Uruguay, Latin American leaders are no longer taking direction from Washington -- although they generally remain happy to take US anti-drug dollars.

[image:3 align:left caption:true]7.Safe Injection Sites Start Spreading

The notion of providing a place where intravenous drug users could shoot up under medical supervision and get access to referrals to public health and welfare services was derided by foes as setting up "shooting galleries" and enabling drug use, but safe injection sites have proven to be an effective intervention, linked to reduced overdoses, reduced crime, and moving drug users toward treatment.

These examples of harm reduction in practice first appeared in Switzerland in the late 1980s; with facilities popping up in Germany and the Netherlands in the 1990s; Australia, Canada, Luxembourg, Norway, and Spain in the 2000s; and, most recently, Denmark and France.

By now, there are nearly a hundred safe injection sites operating in at least 61 cities worldwide, including 30 in Holland, 16 in Germany, and eight in Switzerland. We are likely to see safe injection sites in Ireland and Scotland very soon.

It looks like they will soon be appearing in the United States, too. Officials in at least two cities, San Francisco and Seattle, are well on the way to approving them, although the posture of the federal government could prove an obstacle.

8. And Heroin Maintenance, Too

Even more forward looking as a harm reduction measure than safe injection sites, heroin maintenance (or opiate-assisted treatment) has expanded slowly, but steadily over the past two decades. The Swiss did the first trials in 1994, and now such programs are available there (after decisively winning a 2008 referendum on the issue), as well as Germany and the Netherlands.

Such programs have been found to reduce harm by helping users control their drug use, reducing overdoses, reducing drug-related disease, and promoting overall health and well-being, while also reducing social harms by reducing crime related to scoring drugs, reducing public use and drug markets, and promoting less chaotic lifestyles among participants, leading to increased social integration and better family life and employment prospects.

A Canadian pilot program, the North American Opiate Medication Initiative (NAOMI) produced similar results. Maybe the United States will be ready to get it a try one of these years.

9. New Drugs, New Markets

So far, this has been the century of new drugs. Known variously as "research chemicals," "designer drugs," or fake this and that, let's call them new psychoactive substances (NSPs). Whether it's synthetic cannabinoids, synthetic cathinones, synthetic benzodiazepines, synthetic opioids, or something entirely novel, someone somewhere is producing it and selling it.

In its 2017 annual review, the European Monitoring Center on Drugs and Drug Addictions (EMCDDA) reported in was monitoring 620 NSPs, up from 350 in 2013, and was adding new ones at the rate of over one a week.

These drugs, often of unknown quality or potency, in some cases have wreaked havoc among drug users around the world and are a prime example of the bad things that can happen when you try to suppress some drugs: You end up with worse ones.

The communications technology revolution that began with the world wide web impacts drug policy just as it impact everything else. Beginning with the infamous Silk Road drug sales website, the dark web and the Tor browser have enabled drug sellers and consumers to hook up anonymously online, with the drugs delivered to one's doorstep by Fedex, UPS, and the like.

Silk Road has been taken down and its proprietor, Ross Ulbricht, jailed for decades in the US, but as soon as Silk Road was down, new sites popped up. They got taken down, and again, new sites popped up. Rinse and repeat.

European authorities estimate the size of the dark web drug marketplace at about $200 million a year -- a fraction of the size of the overall trade -- but warn that it is growing rapidly. And why not? It's like an Amazon for drugs.

10.Massacring Drug Suspects in Southeast Asia

Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte has drawn international condemnation for the bloody war he unleashed on drug suspects upon taking office last year. Coming from a man who made his reputation for leading death squads while Mayor of Davao City, the wave of killings is shocking, but not surprising. The latest estimates are that some 12,000 people have been killed.

What's worse is that Duterte's bad example seems to be gaining some traction in the neighborhood. Human rights groups have pointed to a smaller wave of killings in Indonesia, along with various statements from Indonesian officials expressing support for Duterte-style drug executions. And most recently, a Malaysian member of parliament urged his own country to emulate Duterte's brutal crackdown.

This isn't the first time Southeast Asia has been the scene of murderous drug war brutality. Back in 2003, then Thai Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra launched a war on drugs that saw 2,800 killed in three months.

Categories: Canada

Chronicle AM: North American Pot Sales to Top $10 Billion This Year, Report Says, More... (12/6/17)

Canada (STDW) - Wed, 12/06/2017 - 20:50

There's more money in legal weed than even the analysts thought, BC will let 19-year-olds buy pot, Peruvian coca planting was up last year, and more.

[image:1 align:left caption:true]Marijuana Policy

Retail Pot Sales Will Hit $10 Billion This Year, Report Says. A new report from the Arcview Market Research group says North American marijuana sales are growing faster than expected and should hit the $10 billion mark this year. And next year could see even faster growth with both California and Canada set to become legal marketplaces next year. Arcview said it now expects the legal marijuana market to hit $24.5 billion by 2021.

International

British Columbia Lays Out Pot Rules, Will Allow Sales to 19-Year-Olds. BC became the latest Canadian province to roll out proposed rules for looming legal marijuana, announcing that it will allow sales through a mix of government and private stores and that it will allow people 19 and over to possess and purchase marijuana. The province has not yet finalized other issues, such as whether online sales will be allowed and whether existing shops would be able to apply for licenses. Those decisions are expected next month.

Paraguay Congress Approves Medical Marijuana Planting. The congress passed a bill Tuesday that creates a state-sponsored system to import marijuana seeds and grow crops for medicinal uses. The move comes half a year after the congress approved the importation of cannabis oil, but patients and advocates had complained about problems with access. The bill still needs to be signed into law, but that is expected given that the government supports the bill.

Peruvian Coca Planting Jumped Last Year. The area planted with coca grew by 9% in 2016, the UN Office on Drugs and Crime said Tuesday. Coca cultivation covered about 110,000 acres. Coca cultivation in Colombia, Peru's chief competitor, was at more than 360,000 acres, although that could be a blip related to producer incentives linked to the peace agreement between the FARC and the government.

Philippines President Orders National Police Back to Drug War Operations. President Rodrigo Duterte has ordered the National Police to rejoin anti-drug operations. He had pulled them off the brutal crackdown on drug users and sellers in October, weeks before he hosted a summit of world leaders, including US President Donald Trump. This is the second time Duterte has pulled the National Police from the job and then reinstated them; the first time was in January, amidst public outrage over the killing of a South Korean businessman. 

Categories: Canada

CN AB: Med Students Say Pot Revenues Should Fund Mental Health

Canada (MAP) - Sun, 12/03/2017 - 08:00
Edmonton Sun, 03 Dec 2017 - A group of Alberta's future doctors are calling on the provincial government to use cannabis tax revenue to fund mental health initiatives for youth. At least, that will be the pitch when 40 medical students from the University of Alberta and University of Calgary get together Monday with MLAs from various parties.
Categories: Canada

CN AB: Budding Concerns

Canada (MAP) - Sun, 12/03/2017 - 08:00
The Calgary Sun, 03 Dec 2017 - Alberta cities want to hash out details on dealing with fallout from legalized marijuana Who's going to do what, who's going to pay for what?" Barry Morishita, Alberta Urban Municipalities Association
Categories: Canada

CN MB: Usage Expected To Spike: Survey

Canada (MAP) - Sat, 12/02/2017 - 08:00
Winnipeg Free Press, 02 Dec 2017 - MORE than 21 per cent of adult Manitobans used cannabis in the past year and another 21.1 per cent may try it after legalization, new data from the Liquor and Gaming Authority of Manitoba suggests. The figures come from an anonymous phone survey of 1,201 adults in September. The alcohol and gambling regulator, whose mandate will include marijuana, says its sample is "quasi-representative" of the province's adult population. The survey found 55.2 per cent of Manitobans have used cannabis, with 16 being the most common age of initiation.
Categories: Canada

CN BC: PUB LTE: Legal Marijuana Will Make Canada Safer

Canada (MAP) - Sat, 12/02/2017 - 08:00
Victoria Times-Colonist, 02 Dec 2017 - On July 1, 2018, marijuana is going to be legalized in Canada. However, there is no need to fear. In fact, Canadians should feel more at ease as July 1 approaches. Legalization means many things for Canadians. Once a substance is legalized, it directly and aggressively hemorrhages revenue from the black market. When criminal organizations lose money, they lose power. When they lose power, they lose their ability to negatively affect society.
Categories: Canada

CN ON: Doctor Rebukes Mp Over Marijuana Claim

Canada (MAP) - Sat, 12/02/2017 - 08:00
The Chatham Daily News, 02 Dec 2017 - Legalized marijuana will 'enslave our youth" and turn the federal government into "the new pusher on the block," a Chatham politician says - drawing a rebuke from the community's top publichealth official. Dave Van Kesteren said that nothing about the federal government's Cannabis Act is good, but he's particularly concerned about how it allows youth ages 11 to 17 to carry up to five grams of cannabis.
Categories: Canada

CN MB: Don't Delay Legal Pot: Most Manitobans

Canada (MAP) - Sat, 12/02/2017 - 08:00
Winnipeg Free Press, 02 Dec 2017 - A SLIGHT majority of Manitobans disagree with Premier Brian Pallister's calls to delay federal legalization of cannabis in Canada, according to a new online poll from the Angus Reid Institute. Fifty-eight per cent of Manitoba respondents say, "The timeline should not be changed." Nationwide, 53 per cent of all respondents agree.
Categories: Canada

CN ON: LTE: Common Sense Lacking In Today's Canada

Canada (MAP) - Sat, 12/02/2017 - 08:00
The Peterborough Examiner, 02 Dec 2017 - Why is Canada being changed for the worse? For example, young peoples' brains are definitely adversely affected by THC in marijuana and yet we are legalizing this garbage? We, soon, will be a nation of idiots. Why is it that our judiciary is letting a convicted murderers out on un-escorted passes i.e. Melissa Todorovic and Tara Sanderson. Are the victims granted life again? NO, but the murderers are not punished.
Categories: Canada
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